Learning About the World

Social Studies


Family and Community; Civics, Government and Society

Goal 1: Children identify themselves initially as belonging to a family, a group and a community; eventually they develop awareness of themselves as members of increasingly wider circles of society and learn the skills needed to be a contributing member of society.

By the end of each age group or grade level, most children will have met prior age group or grade level standards in this domain.

Infants Through Older Toddlers

Infants

(0-12 Months)

  1. Demonstrate recognition of family members and caretakers by smiling, vocalizing, or crawling in the their direction
  2. Show a preference for familiar versus unfamiliar adults
  3. Explore the similarities and differences among people (e.g., touching their faces or hair, watching others’ facial expressions)
  4. Seek family members and other familiar adults for play and meeting their needs

Young Toddlers

(9-18 Months)

  1. Use simple words to show recognition of family members (e.g., Dada)
  2. Observe and imitate routine actions of family members and others whom child feels comfortable with
  3. Show comfort of being in familiar settings, routines

Older Toddlers

(18-36 Months)

  1. Demonstrate ability to point out and name family members and caregivers
  2. Respond accurately when asked for first and last name
  3. Identify some community workers by uniforms or equipment (e.g., become fireman when put on fireman hat, role play teacher)
  4. Follow simple rules at home or in the classroom
  5. Use play to communicate what they know about their community (e.g., pretend to go to a restaurant)
  6. Help with daily routines (e.g., passing out cups and napkins at snack time)
Younger Preschoolers Through Kindergartners

Younger Preschoolers

(36-48 months)

  1. Talk about close family members and their relationships to each other
  2. Contribute to their class community (e.g., help clean up area didn’t play in)
  3. Identify self as part of a specific group (e.g., family, class)
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of a group’s rules and outcomes of choices they make
  5. Take part in the responsibilities of being in a family or group (e.g., participate in clean-up)

Older Preschoolers

(48-60 months)

  1. Identify various groups they belong to (e.g., family, class, neighborhood)
  2. Define group membership according to different contexts (e.g., class member, family members, T-ball team)
  3. Describe their own family structure and family roles
  4. Act as citizens by demonstrating positive interactions with group members
  5. Explain the need for rules in a variety of settings (e.g., home, classroom, playground), and for laws in the community
  6. Describe roles and responsibilities of various occupations in their community (e.g., policeman, teachers, librarians)

Kindergartners

  1. Act as citizens by contributing to the life of the class and school
  2. Explain that rules are established for the benefit of individuals and groups
  3. Identify people in the community who make, apply and enforce rules at home, school and community (e.g., police, school principal)
  4. Identify people in the community who help to meet the needs of people in the community (e.g., firefighters, doctors)
  5. Communicate with individuals and groups and identify feelings that might lead to interpersonal conflicts
  6. Name various social, economic and governmental institutions in the community (e.g., school, church, grocery store)
First Graders Through Third Graders

First Graders

  1. Describe what it means to be a responsible member of a group
  2. Describe what their roles are as members of various groups
  3. Demonstrate positive interaction with group members (e.g., working with a partner to complete a task)
  4. Explain own point of view on issues that affect themselves
  5. Participate in setting and following the rules of the group, school, community
  6. Identify rules or laws that solve a specific problem or apply to a specific situation (e.g., raising hands, crossing at the light)
  7. Explain why rules and laws are written down
  8. Identify the consequences of not following rules or laws
  9. Describe characteristics of good leadership and fair decision-making and how those affect others (e.g., line leader)
  10. Explain that people have rights and needs (e.g. fairness)
  11. Identify how the groups to which a person belongs (family, friends, team, community) influence how she/he thinks and acts
  12. Define own rights and needs – and the rights and needs of others – in the classroom, school, and playground (e.g., “I” statements)
  13. Give examples of ways they are similar to and different from others (e.g., gender, eye color, skin color, likes and dislikes)
  14. Identify examples of interdependence among individuals and groups (e.g., family, sports team)
  15. Describe feelings and situations that might lead to conflict (e.g., fighting over being first in line).
  16. Describe ways that people solve problems
  17. Identify ways in which local institutions promote the common good (e.g., police enforce rules and laws, fire department)

Second Graders

  1. Describe what it means to be a responsible member of a group
  2. Describe what their roles are as members of various groups
  3. Demonstrate positive interaction with group members (e.g., working with a partner to complete a task)
  4. Explain own point of view on issues that affect themselves
  5. Participate in setting and following the rules of the group, school, community
  6. Identify rules or laws that solve a specific problem or apply to a specific situation (e.g., raising hands, crossing at the light)
  7. Explain why rules and laws are written down
  8. Identify the consequences of not following rules or laws
  9. Describe characteristics of good leadership and fair decision-making and how those affect others (e.g., line leader)
  10. Explain that people have rights and needs (e.g. fairness)
  11. Identify how the groups to which a person belongs (family, friends, team, community) influence how she/he thinks and acts
  12. Define own rights and needs – and the rights and needs of others – in the classroom, school, and playground (e.g., “I” statements)
  13. Give examples of ways they are similar to and different from others (e.g., gender, eye color, skin color, likes and dislikes)
  14. Identify examples of interdependence among individuals and groups (e.g., family, sports team)
  15. Describe feelings and situations that might lead to conflict (e.g., fighting over being first in line).
  16. Describe ways that people solve problems
  17. Identify ways in which local institutions promote the common good (e.g., police enforce rules and laws, fire department)

Third Graders

  1. Identify the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in a school and local community
  2. Demonstrate positive interaction with group members Identify problems, then plan and implement solutions in the classroom, school or community
  3. Explain own point of view on issues that affect themselves and society
  4. Demonstrate the role of individuals in the election processes (e.g., voting in class or mock elections).
  5. Describe the roots of American culture, its development and many traditions, and the ways many people from a variety of groups and backgrounds played a role in creating it
  6. Participating in setting, following and changing the rules of the group and school
  7. Compare similarities of rules and laws
  8. Locate written rules and laws for school and community.
  9. Explain what makes a just rule or law
  10. Describe how characteristics of good leadership and fair decision-making affect others
  11. Explain how a community promotes human rights
  12. Identify and describe ways regional, ethnic, and national cultures influence individuals’ daily lives
  13. Define their own rights and needs – and the rights and needs of others – in the classroom, school, and community
  14. Give examples of ways they are similar to and different from others (e.g. gender, race, religion, ethnicity)
  15. Cite examples, both past and present, of how diversity has led to change
  16. Identify examples of interdependence among individuals and groups. (e.g., buyers and sellers)
  17. Identify behaviors that foster cooperation among individuals.
  18. Identify different types of conflict among individuals and groups (e.g., girls and boys, religion, goods)
  19. Explain different ways in which conflict has been resolved, and different ways in which conflicts and their resolution have affected people

Vermont Agency of Education
Secretary Daniel M. French
219 North Main Street, Suite 402
Barre, VT 05641

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